Tagged with “slides”


A plumber’s guide to Git

Git is a very common tool in modern development workflows. It’s incredibly powerful, and I use it all the time — I can’t remember the last time I used a version control tool that wasn’t Git — but it’s a bit of a black box. How does it actually work?

For a long time, I’ve only had a vague understand of the Git’s inner workings. I think it’s important to understand my tools, because it makes me more confident and effective, so I wanted to learn how Git works under the hood. To that end, I gave a workshop at PyCon UK 2017 about Git internals. Writing the workshop forced me to really understand what was going on.

The session wasn’t videoed, but I do have my notes and exercises. There were four sections, each focusing on a different Git concept. It was a fairly standard format: I did a bit of live demo to show the new ideas, then people would work through the exercises on their own laptop. I wandered around the room, helping people who were stuck, or answering questions, then we’d come together to discuss the exercise. Repeat. On the day, we took about 2 ½ hours to cover all the material.

If you’re trying to follow along at home, the Git book has a great section on the low-level commands of Git. I made heavy reference to this when I wrote the notes and exercises.

If you’re interested, you can download the notes and exercises.

(There are a few amendments and corrections compared to the workshop, because we discovered several mistakes as we worked through it!)

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Using privilege to improve inclusion

When I go to tech conferences, I’m often drawn to the non-technical talks. Talks about diversity, or management, or culture. So when it came to make a proposal for this year’s PyCon UK, I wanted to see if I could write my own non-technical talk.

Talking about diversity and inclusion can be tricky. It’s easy to be well-intentioned, but end up saying something that’s harmful or offensive. But it’s an important topic — the tech industry has systemic problems with inclusion, and recent news shows us how far we still have to go. I chose it for both those reasons — in part because it’s an important topic, and in part to challenge myself by speaking about a topic I hadn’t tackled before.

This is a talk about privilege. It’s about how we, as people of privilege in the tech industry, can do more to build cultures that are genuinely inclusive.

I first gave this talk at PyCon UK 2017. You can read the slides and notes on this page, or download the slides as a PDF. The notes are a rough approximation of what I planned to say, written after the conference finished. My spoken and written voice are quite different, but it gets the general gist across.

If you’d prefer, you can watch the conference video on YouTube:

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Ode to docopt

Every week, we have an hour of developer learning at work – maybe a talk, a workshop, or some other session about of topic of interest to developers. Last week, we did a round of lightning talks. We’re quite a mixed group of developers – in background, technical stacks, and what we actually work on – so coming up with a topic that’s useful to all can be tricky.

For my slot, I decided to wax lyrical about the docopt library. Once upon a time, I was sceptical, but it’s become my go-to library for any sort of command-line interface. Rather than fiddling with argparse and the like, I just write a docopt help string, and the hard work is done for me. I’ve used it in multiple languages, and thought it might be handy for other devs at work. Ergo, this talk.

You can download my slides as a PDF, or read the notes below.

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